What To Do If You Don’t Get Accepted at College

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

By Dr. Kat Cohen
August 5, 2015

College admissions isn’t what it used to be.

Over just the last 10 years, the process of applying to college has changed dramatically, with dropping admission rates, more complex applications, and the revision of the SAT and ACT. These days, it’s easy for students to fall behind on their college prep, leaving them with few – if any – college options.

The key to success when applying to college is to start early and develop a balanced list of best-fit target, reach, and likely colleges. For many students, this can be the most difficult part of the admissions journey. Many end up either applying to only or too many out of reach colleges (that they end up being rejected from), or haphazardly applying to likely colleges thinking they’re a shoo-in, and not getting the outcome they expected. Colleges consider factors like demonstrated interest, hoe likely a student is to attend, and yield, the actual percentage of admitted students who enroll, when making decisions, and a sloppy application to a “safety” school can sometimes end in rejection.

Other factors can also leave students empty-handed when the acceptances start “mailing” out. Perhaps as a result of poor grades, disciplinary problems, or just lack of motivation, students may find theselves at the end their high school careers without a clear path to college.

For those left with few, or even no college acceptances at the end of senior year of high school, not all hope is lost. There are still options to consider in order to stay productive over the next year and eventually secure an acceptance to a best-fit college.

Take a gap year.
This is a popular option for many students who were unable to secure an acceptance to a top-choice college, or any college at all. The growing popularity of the gap year isn’t just the result of students finding it difficult to get into college, though. Research has shown that, even for high-achieving students, a gap year can be an immensely positive experience that can increase motivation and chances of graduating college once they do get to campus. Even some students who do get into one of their top choice colleges choose to defer admission for a year in order to take advantage of a gap year.

For students who didn’t get into college, a gap year is a great time to recharge, reflect, gain experience through a gap year project, and reapply to colleges. Use the summer to research colleges, build a balanced college list, and prep for college entrance exams should you need to improve your scores. Then, start working on applications again in August once the Common Application opens. Create a comprehensive college application timeline and stick to it. While filling your time during your gap year with activities like volunteering, traveling, or working will be necessary, so is staying on track for college applications.

Consult NACAC for colleges still accepting applications.
Every year after the May 1 enrollment deadline passes, the National Association for College Admission Counseling compiles a list of colleges that are still accepting applications for the upcoming fall semester. This is good news for students who were unable to secure an acceptance during the traditional admissions season, as many colleges stop accepting applications for the fall in January or February. Many of these colleges are smaller, private schools looking to fill empty spots, but there are also a number of larger, public universities featured. If you didn’t get into any college during the regular admissions cycle, consult this list to see if there are any schools that you might want still to apply to. You might be surprised to see a school or two that you may have considered before but didn’t end up pursuing. In addition, because these schools are trying to manage enrollment by extending application deadlines, there might be some financial aid left over that they can offer these applicants.

Attend a community college.
For those who may not have gained acceptance because of poor academic performance, attending a community college for a year can be a great way to gain college credit while establishing a solid college GPA. A year at a community college also allows students to mature and ease into the rigors of a college workload – preparing them for the demands of a four-year college should they transfer. And there’s proof that this works: About 60% of students who transfer to a four-year institution from a community college graduate with a bachelor’s degree within four years.

Spend a year taking courses related to your field of interest, and perform well. Then in the spring, begin applying for transfer admission to schools of interest. Treat this as the regular admissions process by creating a balanced list, an application timeline, and allowing plenty of time to gather the required materials. The transfer admissions process is a little different than the undergraduate admissions process, so make sure you’re informed on the differences and you know what to expect.

Gain experience.
Whether you consider it a gap year or just a year off to figure things out, you should stay busy, gaining experience related to your major or career of interest. Use the summer after high school graduation to find internship or part-time work opportunities that interest you and will help you gain relevant experience. When it comes time to reapply to college, schools will want to know how you’ve spent your time since graduation, and a resume of relevant work experiences will go a long way to show colleges that you’re responsible, committed, and developing a specialty. Experience doesn’t just have to happen in a work or internship setting. Take a few courses at a local community college or explore some MOOCs that relate to your intended major. Continue to read relevant books and publications and find volunteer opportunities that also relate to your interests.

An unsuccessful admissions season can be extremely discouraging for students who had their hearts set on attending college in the fall. While it’s normal to feel disappointed, don’t let it cloud your view of the opportunities that you do have. There’s plenty that students can do to enhance their chances of admission the next time around, whether they apply as transfer or undergraduate students. This is just one bump in the road to your college dreams – don’t let it be a roadblock!